Coins 4 Kids

Taking on childhood cancer one penny at a time

Making A Difference

Providing Hope...
Your Donations Are Funding Promising Research!

It is widely recognized that the progress in cancer survival rates among children is the result of successful clinical trials, where work from our nation's laboratories is translated into clinical application. For children, the standard of care today is to be treated in a clinical trial, and more than 70 percent of children with cancer participate. Your donations are providing hope!

 
Promising Research Studies Enable
The Development Of New Treatments

 

 
 
click here For more about the
Children's Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation 
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Researchers Dedicated To Finding New Treatments & A Cure

The hope of these wonderful doctors is to find new treatments and a cure; they are dedicated to a future where no child has to undergo brutal cancer treatments.  Research funding raised in part by organizations such as the Children's Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation & Coins 4 Kids help make new nb treatments possible.


Dr. Giselle Sholler, MD 
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital
Giselle.sholler@helendevoschildrens.org


left: Dr. Giselle Sholler spends time with neuroblastoma patients Jack Brown (left), 6, and Dustin Cobb, 9, at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, VT.

Dr. Sholler is a pediatric oncologist at the Helen DeVos Children's Hospital.  Sholler is the lead researcher working with a promising new drug,  nifurtimox.  Dr. Sholler has zeroed in on its ability to kill neuroblastoma cancer cells. The discovery: Sholler was a fellow at Brown University in 2004 when she discovered that nifurtimox might hold hope for neuroblastoma patients. She was treating a young girl who had neuroblastoma and had contracted Chagas disease, a parasitic disease typically found in Central and South America but not common in the United States. The treatment for Chagas was nifurtimox, an antibiotic made by Bayer. The drug treated not only the Chagas but sent the girl's neuroblastoma into a tailspin.  Click here  for more about Dr. Scholler's research

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Dr. Susan L.Cohn, MD 
Professor of Pediatrics
Director, Clinical Research,
Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Comer Children's Hospital/The University of Chicago

Dr. Cohn with neuroblastoma patient, baby Leo

Dr. Cohn is a highly respected expert in pediatric cancers and blood diseases. She is a leading authority on neuroblastoma, a cancer of nerve cells, and the most common type of cancer found in infants. Dr. Cohn is actively researching several aspects of neuroblastoma. She is one of the few pediatric oncologists in the United States who is conducting Phase I clinical trials of promising treatments for the disease. View a partial list of Dr. Cohn's publications through the National Library of Medicine's PubMed online database.

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Dr. Brian H. Kushner


Deptartment of Pediatrics/Oncology
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
2375 York Avenue
New York, NY 10021

Dr. Kushner is recognized internationally for his work in developing treatment programs for neuroblastoma.  In collaboration with other investigators, Dr. Kushner is currently researching ways to use the patient's own immune system against these cancers.

Dawson DeCap (right) is one of the many children from all over the world who have traveled to NY for 3f8 monoclonal antibody treatments that Dr. Kushner and his Associates have developed. 

  Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
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  Dr. John Maris

 Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP)
 Member of New Approaches to Neuroblastoma Treatments (NANT) 

  • Dr. Maris is focused on neuroblastoma treatment.  He strives to maintain a truly translational research program by taking clinical observations to the laboratory, and returning the laboratory discoveries to the clinic. His goal is to establish a comprehensive approach to neuroblastoma, which has resulted in a diverse laboratory environment with multiple projects focusing on the common endpoint of improved cure rates.




    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Home Button                                                                                            
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  • Dr. Nai-Kong Cheung

    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY
    Phone 212-639-8401
    We have recently initiated a new treatment approach for metastatic neuroblastoma, referred to as protocol N8, which brings together all the best known methods for attacking this disease: surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, isotretinoin, and immunotherapy with the monoclonal antibody 3F8. We are also actively involved in early clinical trials of new therapies, including biologics and vaccines, and their combinations with other treatments. Our theory is that effective treatments for neuroblastoma will provide a paradigm for other metastatic solid tumors of children and adolescents.

    In the laboratory, we continue to unmask the genetic and biochemical makeup of neuroblastic tumors. These tumor profiles at the time of diagnosis can tell us how aggressive a tumor is and what kind of therapy is most effective. We are also developing additional antibody-based targeted therapies for the treatment of other solid tumors in children and adolescents.

    View Nai-Kong V. Cheung's laboratory research.
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
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    Dr. C. Patrick Reynolds
    Texas Tech University Health Sciences

    Dr. Reynold's laboratory focuses on identifying novel agents or combinations of agents that are effective against pediatric malignancies (especially neuroblastoma). They develop laboratory data which supports a biologically based approach to designing new therapies and then test these approaches in phase I, II clinical trials. If warranted, phase III clinical trials are developed determine if the new approach has a role as standard therapy for a given disease. For more information on Dr. Reynold's past discoveries and current Neuroblastoma research please click here.







    Coins4Kids co-founders, Jon Maher & Greg Maher with
    Dr. Reynolds at the 2007 CNCF Neuroblastoma Conference.

    Making A Difference